Letter From My 48th Year (Feb 27)

I’ve been thinking a lot about C, a man I knew in college. At the end of Call Me By Your Name—the novel, not the film—thirty-something Elio visits forty-something Oliver, and I’ve been thinking about what it would be like to run into C again, how he would see me, how I would see him. He’s not on social media at all, but I have seen one recent photo of him and he looks like a man on the verge of 50 tends to look, though he’s still recognizable as the handsome young athlete I last saw roughly more than a quarter of a century ago. I think I could still spot him in a crowd. I imagine I’m fairly recognizable too—fatter, less outwardly drenched in neediness, but still the same round face, the same cheesy smile, the same childlike voice.

It feels odd to write about C though I haven’t told you much of anything at all. It feels somehow indiscreet as if I’m roping him into my tell-all without permission. No, that’s not exactly right. It feels indiscreet because I don’t know how to accurately describe who he was to me, and by writing about him, it feels like I’m implying we were something to each other, that I left marks on him, the way he’s left marks on me. And I just don’t know if that’s true with any certainty. I just don’t know if he’d recognize me in a crowd, or if he did recognize me if he could put his finger on who I was or if he’d even want to.

I’m babbling. Cause I don’t want to write what I’m really thinking about: Did I love him? Did I even know what it meant to love someone then? (Do I know now?) I know that he made me feel my emotions quite powerfully—jealousy, anger—emotions that I was used to tamping down inside me. He disturbed the numbness I cloaked myself in like a security blanket, like a wall. But I don’t know for sure that I ever disturbed anything in him.

I hungered him. I craved him like a drug. I liked the drama of dissecting with my friends every look he ever gave me, every conversation we had. I liked martyring myself in the feelings of unworthiness he triggered in me. (I should say here that those feelings of unworthiness and martyrdom were self-generated; C was never anything but kind to me,)

What the film Call Me By Your Name gets exactly right is the way in which the late teens and the early 20s are a time of gestures. Though we have accrued hundreds of words by the time we hit that age, we rarely use our words when it comes to crushes and infatuations and even love, depending instead on how we interpret or often misinterpret each other’s gestures. And we don’t have the capacity it seems to distinguish between the intended gesture and the accidental gesture, each of which sends its own (supposedly) soul-baring message.

Like me walking down a hill toward campus with C and his friends one day. He tried to put his arm around me and I pulled away for a moment, just to change my purse to my other shoulder so I could comfortably walk him, and then of course he pulled away from my pulling away and… And I wanted to say, “Oh, I was just switching shoulders…” but that series of gestures had spoken so loudly—with the wrong message, of course—that the conversation about us wanting to be close to each other was effectively over.

Or when I saw C several months after we graduated and he reached out to give me a hug, and I froze in his arms and he felt it as a rejection. If I’d known how to use words (and if I’d been courageous), I might have told him that my tension was not a reaction to him exactly, but that I was shocked by how powerfully good it felt to see him again and to have him hold me and I’d simply short-circuited a bit.

I realize these stories do nothing to answer the question of if I loved him. I know he was capable of short-circuiting me, I know I had to numb myself against him, I know I was decades away from being able to be openly vulnerable in the face of someone who made me feel so damned much. But surely, given that this post is populated with “I’s” and “me’s” mean I couldn’t have really loved him. Thinking through it as I write this, he seems more like an object to be acted upon than a love interest. But can someone who was merely the foil for your one-sided romantic drama mark you the way he has marked me? To borrow from myself, what do I name this things between us that left me with “shocky fingerprints?”


Letter from My 48th Year (Feb 26)

I was all fired up to write on my way home. Then I started reading a novel by one of my favorite romance authors, Susan Elizabeth Phillips. And now I’m regretting once again that I made this ridiculous vow to blog every day this year. I don’t want to crack myself open tonight. I don’t want to ignore that Mickalene Thomas is right when she says, “I think it’s the responsibility of the artist to reveal a little more of themselves.” I want to get lost in the story of two people trying to figure out how to love each other. I want to hang out with Daisy who’s figuring out how to claim her own power, and Alex who’s figuring out how to let the light in. And most of all, I want to know that no matter what happens by the time I get to the end, no matter how many times I reread it, Alex and Daisy always get together in the end. And given how much I’m trying to step out of my comfort zone and dare and risk in a way I haven’t in a good long while, or maybe never have given how intentional I’m being about it, I’m going to take a break and be selfish and spend the next couple of hours before bed in that circus with Daisy and Alex, knowing that no matter what, there’s going to be a happy ending.

Letter from My 48th Year (Feb 25)

Here is my artist manifesto. Well, really, it’s manifesto-ish. Manifesto adjacent. It’s not meant to be rigid. I don’t intend to ride or die on this manifesto. What I’m interested in is what I believe as an artist at this particular moment—February 25, 2018 at 4:15pm—and how that informs my plans for the next five minutes, the next five days, the next five months. I don’t expect it to be exactly the same over the next five years, for, as Sonia Sanchez has said:

“I think that the reason why art stays alive is that the artist grows. I mean the body doesn’t stay the same; the brain doesn’t stay the same. Your art can’t stay the same.”

This manifesto-ish thing is by no means comprehensive. I fully expect to read it over tomorrow, or later tonight and see some holes, gaping or otherwise. Still, it’s a way to see where my head’s at, to gather my thoughts, after a week of iron sharpening iron conversations—including two individual chats today with women artists I respect and adore as well as a three-hour symposium listening to really smart, passionate people speak smartly and passionately.

I don’t think there is anything original in this manifesto-ish thing. I am not the only one who’s had these thoughts or ideas, and, in fact, many of these thoughts/ideas are paraphrases of what other people have said to me during various creative collisions. I don’t believe we either think or create in a vacuum, but more on that below.

So here are some things I think as related to the artist’s life and practice, which you can take as a manifesto or a roadmap or a meditation or a behind-the-scenes of my brain pan or not take in any way at all.

Iron sharpens iron. (See here and here for further thoughts on that.)

I have to define my quest, my hero’s journey for myself. I may be Frodo or I may be Sam. I may switch roles as the quest requires. My quest may not look like anyone else’s, nor may it even seem like a quest. All of that is okay. It’s about feeling a sense of momentum, moving forward (or inching forward), even if we cannot make out what it is we’re moving toward either consistently or conclusively.

It’s okay to not be able to see past the bend in the road. But I should also not be fearful to imagine what’s past the bend in the road. So what if I’m wrong?

I must dream big. Then dream bigger than that. Then take a step forward. Baby steps are fine. As are leaps.

I do not have to wait for my greatness. I have to walk into the greatness I hold within myself right now. And, yes, we all hold greatness within us in some form or fashion,  in some magnitude right at this very moment.

I must consistently and constantly be willing to ask and answer the questions: How am I stopping myself? How do I not stop myself?

There is no such thing as originality. I am always standing on the shoulders of someone else’s thought, someone else’s creativity, someone else’s work. What I mean when I say something is my original work is “I am being as faithful as I possibly can within this work of art to my own experience, my own vision.”

If I can’t write from a place of authority, I must write from a place of discovery. I also need to privilege work created from a place of creativity over that created from a place of authority. To quote Azar Nafisi paraphrasing Milan Kundera, “Artists are not here to preach the truth, they are here to discover it.”

I must engage fully in my life at all times. What that means from day to day may change. And what that means for someone else is probably not what it means for me.

I must allow myself to take up space in my life and in the lives of others. I must allow myself to inhabit my voice fully. There are people who need my voice in the same way there are those whose voices I need.

Letter From My 48th Year (Feb 24)

It’s Saturday night and I don’t know what to do with myself. I thought I was going to see Phantom Thread but my nap lasted longer than I thought. I am always so tired on Saturday afternoons, possibly from struggling to unearth the Italian buried in whatever past of my brain stores 1987-1989 (when I first studied Italian) so I can get through my Italian class sounding like I’ve occasionally made out with the language or at least made eyes at it.

Thursday evening I interviewed the Iraqi-American playwright Heather R., a fierce advocate for women’s voices, particularly mothers’ voices on the stage. Tomorrow morning I am having breakfast with the actor and playwright Nikkole S. (who I also met through an interview for work) and who always inspires and encourages me to raise my voice. Nikkole’s in town to be part of a symposium on Theater as Politics (using Hamlet and Heather’s play Noura as jumping off points), which is programmed by my friend, the dramaturg (and sometimes playwright) Hannah R. I also had a good talk about future writing projects yesterday with the entrepreneur Sylvia M., who I met years ago when I was a part of a panel on how to do social media.*

I list these names not just because I’m prone to name dropping (Hi Armie Hammer!), but because this is what iron sharpening iron looks like in real life. Putting myself in the room with, or at least in a conversation with (and hopefully, a friendship with—I’m looking at you Heather) passionate, committed women who are, to borrow a phrase, doing the damn thing. While the seeds of my relationships with Nikkole, Hannah, and Sylvia came through a task I was doing for my day job, the actual relationships came from saying some version of “Are you on Facebook because I want to friend you?” or “Would you like to have coffee?” or “Do you want to try and do this project together?” They came from making myself vulnerable to a polite brush-off or even a flat-out No.

And yes, I could make a long long list of people to whom I asked those questions and with whom nothing long lasting ever sparked. The thing about making oneself vulnerable is that it doesn’t always work out, or it doesn’t work out the way you expected it might.

Or sometimes the initial connection turns out to be secondary to a connection you make via that initial connection. Take an actor friend I adore and connected with after an interview, but now don’t chat with often because life. Through the wonders of social media I’ve now become friends with his brother—one of my favorite people though we haven’t met IRL—who, though he’s not living an artist’s life is living a life full of passion for a sport he loves and doing the damn thing when it comes to nurturing that passion in the young people in his community. Which, in turn, encourages me to be passionate and committed. (Yes, James R., I am talking about you.)

And that is, in part, why I’m going to Italian class every Saturday. Yes, I do want to learn the language again, but more than that, I want to connect with people who are inspired and passionate, who may become good friends for the long haul, or maybe just for the seven weeks we’re together trying to figure out how to wrap our tongues around the passato remoto. Hmmm, maybe next week in class I’ll ask them to help me figure out how to say “Iron sharpens iron” in Italian.

*This is probably my favorite public speaking thing I’ve ever done, mostly because someone hollered out at some point, “Hey that NEA woman’s pretty funny!”

Letter from My 48th Year (Feb 23)

So I could write some stuff orrrrr you could just listen to the most excellent playlist ever and pretty much know everything there is to know about me. I’m just saying…. (BTW, I suggest you pick the listen to the playlist option cause I’m doing busy watching Wreck-It Ralph to write anything.)

Letter from My 48th Year (Jan 22)

I have no answers for you tonight, but I do have a question—by way of an interview I just did with the legendary innovator and choreographer Bebe Miller—that we should all ask ourselves on a regular basis:

How do I not stop myself?


Letter from My 48th Year (Feb 21)

Here are some things you should read:

“Why “Black Panther” is a Defining Moment for Black America”

Just 20 Descriptions of Armie Hammer’s Voice

Just 20 Descriptions of Jon Hamm’s Voice

Her Eyes Were Watching the Stars: How Missy Elliot Became an Icon

Mixed Feelings: Am I Too Fat for Love?

And in case you’re not tired of watching me read poems yet, here I am at the now gone but not forgotten Monday Night Poetry and Blues in Charleston, October 2011

Oh, and you should definitely watch this, often, and honestly, I’m kinda judging you right now if you’ve never seen it …

Letter From My 48th Year (Jan 20)

Just back from the first read for Forum Theatre’s production of Nat Turner in Jerusalem by Nathan Alan Davis. Just hearing two extraordinarily talented actors reading an extraordinarily well written script was transformative. And it’s only going to get better once the director and designers layer on their vision. I am quite excited to see it up on its feet. I wish it wasn’t time for me to start getting ready for bed because it’s the kind of work that’s so good you want to come home and work on your own projects. Instead I’m going to de-fuschia my lips, hang out in the shower luxuriating in the hot water for far too long, and then slather myself in coconut oil so I smell good when Jon Hamm shows up in my dreams. (One of these things may not actually happen.)

But that’s enough about me. Mostly tonight I wanted to share this response from Jason V. to this blog post I wrote about vulnerability. (Rumor has it he and Andrea O. are starting a blog soon and I’m soooooo here for it and I’ll make sure to share the news when it happens. Did you see that Andrea and Jason—I said “when” not “if.” I’m just saying….)

So without further ado, here’s Jason…

I want to take care of you but you first have to let me.

I’ve always found this to be one of the most difficult parts of any relationship, romantic or otherwise. The part where you love someone, and you need them, and you need things from them… emotional and physical and maybe even financial things… but you can’t bring yourself to let them help you. Whether it is a conscious decision/choice you’re making or something in the back of your mind and heart that prevents you from accepting help… you just can’t bring yourself to let them help you.

It’s a scary concept – the idea of needingsomeone. You feel vulnerable. You feel helpless at times. You feel as if you should have it together enough to never need anyone in these ways, no matter who it is. This becomes more pronounced the older we get. Accepting help is a very big deal for many of us. Especially those of us who carry forth certain (often very toxic) personality traits. Traits like pride. Ego. Guilt. Shame. Low self-worth. These characteristics tend to work to our own detriment, especially when we really need the help of a friend. We’ll hide the need for help. Even when we accept the help, we’ll hide the fact of that too. Or we’ll resent the person offering the help, like it’s somehow his or her fault that we need it!

And what can easily happen is we don’t accept the help we desperately need. Usually for reasons that are so unimportant to our overall health. We reject people who love us and want to see us do well and genuinely want to help us for… well, for what exactly? What does accepting help we need do to us or make us feel that we so often reject and avoid it?

It can make us feel weak. Weak in the eyes of others and in our own eyes as well. No one wants to appear weak to the outside world or to the people they care about. So we’ll reject help to prove our own strength except… the need for the help is still there. It hasn’t gone anywhere so in reality we’re no stronger than we were before we rejected the help.

It can make us feel like failures. Like because we don’t have enough money to pay the rent this month, we’re failed providers. Like because we need someone to put together our resume for us, we’re failed professionals. Like because we’re single parents and need someone to stay with our kids one night, we’re failed parents.

It can make us feel ashamed. Ashamed at ourselves for taking from someone else. Ashamed of ourselves for falling our household or spouse or child.

I’ve refused help I needed because I thought it proved my strength. When I went through a divorce there were friends and family who reached out, genuinely, to offer money or advice or just an ear. For many reasons I rejected most of their offers. I told myself it was because they wouldn’t understand my situation or because I didn’t want to burden anyone with my problems. That was partially true but the bigger truth was I was afraid to look and appear weak. Afraid to look like I couldn’t handle it. Even though the truth was just that – I couldn’t handle it all alone. And I shouldn’t have handled it alone. Even though I wanted to. Even though I tried to.

I didn’t realize it at the time but this refusal to take help I needed had become a personality trait of mine as an adult. As a man, I was always taught to be the rock – to be the backbone. Men are tough and don’t cry. Men stand on their own two feet and don’t ever need or ask for help. In my household, a man is not allowed to need help because if you do it means you’ve failed to do your job as a provider or protector. That was my mentality and it made tough situations even tougher because when I needed money or advice I wouldn’t seek it or accept it. And when I divorced and took on twin 5 year olds basically by myself… I needed help. Help that I didn’t know how to ask for because I’d never really asked for it before. Help with money, going from two incomes to one. Help with childcare so I could get some rest. Help with coping with the loss and help with coaching my children through it too. What’s worse, I had plenty of good people around me, friends and family, who were willing, able and wanting to help me.

I had to change that. And honestly, I only realized this after I felt I was hurting my children. I felt like I was letting pride and ego keep them from receiving help we all needed. I was prioritizing my own feelings over their well being. After I realized that, accepting help became a lot easier. I told myself “this is what’s best for the kids.” And maybe it was a sell job – maybe I was telling myself what I needed to hear to accept the help we needed. But it did allow me to be able to receive things that I needed at the time and that I wouldn’t have accept otherwise.

I learned from that to prioritize what was most important – our overall mental and emotional health and well being – instead of prioritizing my feelings and hangups. Admittedly, this is a lot easier to do when it involves my kids than when it’s me alone. I still have trouble identifying the times when I need help, which makes it more difficult to accept it. I still have a hard time saying the words “yes, I need you.” I still have a hard time accepting that I can’t, or shouldn’t, do everything alone. That whether or not I’m capable of doing it all alone is not nearly as important as doing what’s best for me and my kids.

But I’m getting better.


Letter from My 48th Year (Feb 19)

So I need either a better filing system or a better memory because today’s been about finding poems I’d forgotten I’d written. Sigh.

I’ve also turned my attention back to the book about my Dad, or about me and my Dad, or about the uselessness of language in the face of grief, or probably some other theme I can’t currently see.

I’m sooooo close to the end, and by “end” of course I mean only the end of writing enough poems, which is the beginning of figuring out how to put them all into order in a way that makes sense, which I suspect will be quite tricky given how narrow the subject matter is.

I read a a handful of the Dad poems last night and they seemed to land, and out loud they didn’t seem like too much, so that’s good. (By too much, I mean that it wasn’t so much sadness heaped upon sadness that people started sobbing so loudly that I couldn’t continue, though maybe I wouldn’t have minded that?)

When this book goes out in the world, I wonder whose voice my readers will hear in their head? If they’re lucky, maybe it will be Armie Hammer, though I suppose that would be odd since it’s a book from a daughter’s perspective, but honestly, I’d be okay with my work in his mouth.

But seriously, who would you want to hear read the audiobook (do books of poetry even become audio books, is that a thing)? I wouldn’t want it to be me only because I don’t like listening to myself. I mean I like that so many people have actually watched the video from last night’s reading, but I listened to the song at the beginning (which I started too high on, sigh…) and then couldn’t get myself to listen to any more.

I didn’t mind listening to myself over the microphone last night mostly because I read so differently than what I’d rehearsed at home that it was like hearing the whole thing for the first time. I forget sometimes that I’ve been performing in some way or the other since I was a kid, and I really do come alive in a different way when there’s an audience. I forget that I have stage presence.

I’ve been thinking about how it’s a sin (don’t worry, venial not mortal) to forget who we are, to not see what our particular superpower is and walk in it. Because we’re scared, or some other reason that ultimately boils down to fear. (Fear is the one human constant, don’t you think?) It’s hard to embrace the spotlight of our own authority but we must if we’re to do what it is we’re put on this earth to do.

My particular superpower right now is resisting the siren call of the TV, and instead typing up this definition poem I just found hiding in the back of a file cabinet. It will (maybe) make up for the poems I mercilessly slaughtered today to put them out of their misery, that is, if it escapes the merciless guillotine itself. Good luck poem, good luck!

Letter from My 48th Year (Jan 18)

I admit to being out of words tonight after reading at Sunday Kind of Love hosted by Split This Rock. It’s amazing to look out at a sold-out room full of people gathered to listen to poetry. I’m still trying to process it all—a local college student from Parkland, Florida, reading a poem at the open mike from a friend of hers who witnessed the shooting;another young woman asking me for a hug and saying the father poems really spoke to her; after the reading a group of students from my MFA alma mater patiently listening as I ranted on about why the creative writing program belongs with the rest of the arts not the literature department. And so many of my beloveds —from work, from church, from graduate school, from the local arts scene—-in the audience. My friend M. kindly streamed it on FB for me, and I’ve embedded the video below.


%d bloggers like this: